Friday, March 16, 2018

Statins are gateway drugs for Big Pharma: Take one and you’ll need four or five more prescriptions for the side effects

One out of every three American adults take statins, and if you think that sounds like good news for statin manufacturers, you’re missing the bigger picture. All of Big Pharmabenefits when people take statins. In fact, statins can really be thought of as gateway drugs. After all, they have so many side effects that you will likely end up taking several other medications after you start statins just to deal with them.
What can happen to you if you take these dangerous drugs? They suppress your body’s immune system, rendering it less able to fight off infections. They also inhibit production of coenzyme Q10, which helps to regulate your immune and nervous system and maintain a healthy heart and blood pressure. There’s also a higher risk of neurological diseases when you take statins, with many patients reporting forgetfulness, confusion and memory loss. But don’t worry – whatever happens to you, Big Pharma has a solution for that, too!

Highly increase risk of diabetes

Statins also increase your risk of diabetes, so much so that the FDA has required that a warning label be placed on the package informing people of the link between statins, higher blood glucose levels and diabetes. The risk is especially heightened if you are an older woman. An Australian study found that elderly women who took high doses of statins had a 50 percent higher risk of developing diabetes. This could mean you’ll end up on diabetes medication for the rest of your life.
And for what benefit are you placing yourself at so much risk? According to research published in BMJ, taking statins over the course of two to five years adds just 3.2 days to a patient’s lifespan on average – if the side effects don’t kill them first. Yes, they’ve been approved by the FDA, but how many times has the FDA had to pull drugs after initially approving them as their dangers became too obvious to ignore?

Statin alternatives

If all this make you want to keep your distance from statins, you will be pleased to know there are some great alternatives. Dr. Jack Wolfson, a Phoenix-area holistic cardiologist, believes that a wellness model needs to be followed rather than a sickness one.
In an interview with Mike Adams, the Health Ranger, he pointed out that cardiologists sometimes fall into the easy routine of blindly prescribing statins as Big Pharma tells them to and collecting a paycheck. After all, they’ve got medical school loans to pay off.
Dr. Wolfson asks why people would want to choose statins, which can reduce the risks associated with high cholesterol slightly yet put them at risk of many other problems, when they could take safe actions that bring their risks down to zero? He said that nobody says they feel better when they take statins and blood pressure medications. In contrast, those who turn to evidence-based supplements often report feeling great, losing weight, and having more energy.

Natural alternatives

Some of the alternatives he mentioned in the interview include beetroot powder, magnesium, and Omega 3. He says that we can make such a big difference in our health through food., and he also points out how powerful the sun can be in keeping us healthy. He also suggests that people get more physical activity, such as walking or gardening.
When your health is less than optimum, Dr. Wolfson says, your body is deficient in nutrients, not pharmaceuticals. Drugs might be good for emergencies, but when it comes to prevention, you can’t beat a healthy, well-rounded and nutritious diet, physical activity, and good old-fashioned sunshine. What do you have to lose by trying it?

Newly Engineered Antibody Can Fight Back Against 99 Percent of HIV Strains

A new study has produced an antibody that's able to kill off 99 percent of HIV strains. The protein is made up of three broadly neutralizing antibodies, and it is said to be more effective than any naturally occurring antibody that's been discovered.


Research carried out by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) in conjunction with pharmaceutical firm Sanofi has produced an antibody capable of attacking 99 percent of HIV strains. The International Aids Society has heralded the finding as an “exciting breakthrough.”
The human body has difficulty fighting HIV because of the way that the virus changes and mutates — a single patient can have numerous unique strains of the infection present in their body simultaneously. However, a slim minority of people who suffer from HIV eventually develop a means of battling back in the form of broadly neutralizing antibodies.
These proteins are capable of killing off numerous HIV strains at once, so for this joint study between NIH and Sanofi, researchers set out to find a way to harness this natural defense.

To that end, they combined three unique antibodies to produce a tri-specific antibody. While the most effective naturally occurring antibodies can only target 90 percent of HIV strains, this tri-specific antibody was observed to take on 99 percent. It was even successful at low concentrations. Furthermore, an experiment in which 24 monkeys were administered with the antibodies and then injected with the virus didn’t result in a single infection.
As Sanofi’s Dr. Gary Nabel told the BBC, “[The tri-specific antibodies] are more potent and have greater breadth than any single naturally occurring antibody that’s been discovered.” The next step to putting these powerful antibodies to work is a clinical trial, which is expected to get underway in 2018.


Over the last few decades, we have seen some amazing advances in the fight against HIV. These range from the various treatment methods that are now available to the hugely successful educational campaign that’s been carried out in Africa.

Truly, no stone is being left unturned in the search for better HIV treatments. Scientists in South Africa are investigating the case of a nine-year-old child who was seemingly cured of HIV after receiving antiretroviral therapy. Another study saw researchers look into cows’ ability to produce broadly neutralizing antibodies with the goal of using them to combat the virus.
With any luck, methodology will continue to improve at a fast pace. At the end of 2015, 36.7 million people around the world were living with HIV/AIDS, so clearly a lot more work needs to be done. However, this new research project and others like it could lead to the next level of advancements with regards to the virus.

Insulin, Not Cholesterol, Is the True Culprit in Heart Disease

Story at-a-glance

  • About 80 percent of the cholesterol in your body is made internally, primarily by your liver. The remaining 20 percent comes from your diet. If you consume less, your body will compensate by making more, and vice versa
  • By themselves, total cholesterol and LDL are virtually useless predictors for cardiovascular disease. However, elevated LDL may be a good marker for insulin resistance
  • Evidence suggests high total cholesterol and even high LDL are insignificant when trying to determine your heart disease risk. Your best predictor is your insulin sensitivity

By Dr. Mercola
The video above, "The Fat Emperor: Insulin Versus Cholesterol," features Ivor Cummins, a biochemical engineer with a background in medical device engineering and leading teams in complex problem solving.
In 2013, Cummins ran into health problems. His serum ferritin was very high (which is a potent risk factor for heart disease), as were his liver enzymes. After consulting with three different doctors, he realized none of them really understood the root cause of these problems, or how to address them.
As a result, he delved into the medical literature, found the problem and reversed his abnormal test results. He also dropped 35 pounds in the process.
Eventually, he got more involved in health and began giving lectures such as this one, which was presented at the Low Carb USA Keto Getaway1 in Florida this past January. He also has a website,,2 where he notes:
"I refer primarily to the 'diet-heart' hypothesis, which proposed that dietary saturated fat elevated blood cholesterol, and the latter drove heart disease mortality like nothing else. 
The evidence at the time was loose correlation, certainly not causation, and seems almost laughably naïve in retrospect.
However, the tenaciousness of this flawed hypothesis has turned out to be no laughing matter, condemning millions to the misery of obesity, type 2 diabetes and an extraordinary range of inflammatory diseases.
The factors that conspired to perpetuate the flawed hypotheses were many: academic and research community hubris, political forces, economic imperatives, profiteering from the food and pharmaceutical industries, and the groupthink psychology that underpins the worsening 'diabesity epidemic.
After 25 years in technical/management positions with a personal specialty in complex problem solving, I have been inspired to … bring an engineering-style approach to the current situation."

The Cholesterol Conundrum

The vast majority — about 80 percent — of the cholesterol in your body is made by your liver. The remaining 20 percent comes from your diet. If you consume less, your body will compensate by making more, and vice versa.
Contrary to popular belief, cholesterol is a crucial molecule necessary for optimal health, and not nearly the damaging culprit it's been made out to be.
Since cholesterol is a fatty substance, it does not travel well through your water-based bloodstream. Hence it is encapsulated in a lipoprotein. Cummins likens the very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) your liver makes to a boat that shuttles not only cholesterol but also triglycerides through your bloodstream to your tissues.
The VLDL will dock onto receptors in your muscle tissue, where it releases triglycerides to be used for energy. Cummins accurately notes that eating fat is not the cause of high triglycerides.
If your triglycerides are high, it means you're eating too many net carbohydrates, because it's actually sugar that causes triglycerides to rise, not dietary fat.
Once the VLDL has dropped off the triglycerides to be burnt for energy (or stored as fat if you're not using the energy due to inactivity), the VLDL becomes a low-density lipoprotein (LDL), which in conventional thinking is a "bad" kind of cholesterol.
High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is colloquially known as "good" cholesterol, and the HDL is indeed beneficial in that it acts as a master manager, helping protect the LDL against oxidation and transport triglycerides and cholesterol in and out of the VLDL.
In a healthy person, the LDL will be reabsorbed by the liver after about two days, where it gets broken up and recycled. This is a beautiful system; alas, it is one that can be disrupted if you're eating too many unhealthy foods.
As a general rule, a high-sugar diet will cause damaged LDLs to rise, beneficial HDLs to drop, triglycerides and, often, total cholesterol to rise. All of these are conventional indicators of atherosclerosis or inflammation in your arteries that can precipitate a heart attack.

Beyond Cholesterol — What Really Causes Heart Disease?

According to Dr. Thomas Dayspring, a lipidologist (expert on cholesterol), most heart attacks are due to insulin resistance. He has also stated that LDL "is a near-worthless predictor for cardiovascular issues."
In simple layman's terms Cummins goes on to demonstrate the connection between the metabolic functionality of adipose fat — which actually acts as a signaling organ — and insulin sensitivity, and how and why:
  • A metabolically healthy normal weight (MHNW) person who has good insulin sensitivity has a low risk level for cardiovascular disease (CVD)
  • A metabolically obese yet normal weight (MONW) individual who is insulin resistant has a high risk
  • A metabolically unhealthy obese (MUO) individual who is insulin resistant also has a high risk
  • But a metabolically healthy obese (MHO) individual who has good insulin sensitivity is at low risk for CVD
In other words, there's healthy body fat and unhealthy body fat, or put another way, fat that protects your health and fat that promotes disease. The key difference is the presence or absence of insulin sensitivity.
The higher your insulin resistance, the worse markers such as fasting insulin, triglyceride-HDL ratio and HbA1c will be, suggesting you're at increased risk for diseases such as diabetes and heart disease.
Recent research has shown that two specific metrics: circulating adiponectin and macrophages, can with near 100 percent accuracy predict your obese phenotype, meaning whether you're obese insulin sensitive or obese insulin resistant.

How a High-Sugar Diet Causes Insulin Resistance and Type 2 Diabetes

But what makes one person insulin sensitive and another insulin resistant? This is where your diet comes into play. What you eat tends to be a primary deal-maker or deal-breaker. Other factors that promote systemic insulin resistance include:
Insufficient sleep
Lack of exercise
Omega-6-rich vegetable oils
Low vitamin D/lack of sun exposure
Low omega-3
More often than not, excessive amounts of glucose from net carbs (total carbohydrates minus fiber) are what set the disease process into motion by causing your insulin level to spike. When repeated over time, your adipose fat tissue begins to lose its systemic signaling capabilities, precipitating insulin resistance.
While glucose can be used by most cells in your body, fructose, on the other hand, must be processed by your liver before it can be used. It's actually metabolized in a way similar to alcohol — a similarity evident in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Small amounts of fructose will not cause a problem, but very large amounts will over time trigger systemic insulin resistance.
Eventually, the high sugar load will cause your pancreas to diminish its production of insulin, and the hyperinsulinemia that prevented lipolysis of triglycerides in your fat cells will cease. Subsequently, your liver will begin to output glucose even when you're not eating, and this is when your blood glucose finally begins to skyrocket.
Prior to this, the elevated insulin actually kept the blood glucose in check. But as insulin production drops, there's nothing to prevent the blood glucose from rising anymore. As noted by Cummins, it can take many years for this process to play out before you end up with a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. But you could have gotten a heads-up years, if not decades, earlier using a simple blood test.

Measuring Metabolic Syndrome

Metabolic syndrome is a constellation of factors including:
  • Low HDL cholesterol
  • High triglycerides
  • Large waist circumference
  • High blood pressure
  • High blood sugar
Having three or more of these factors over a certain level is considered evidence of metabolic dysfunction that sets the stage for chronic disease, including not only atherosclerosis and CVD but also gout, cancer, stroke, diabetes, Alzheimer's, NAFLD, arthritis and more.
As noted by Cummins, metabolic syndrome is actually more aptly named insulin resistance syndrome. Moreover, since insulin secretion is the "master measurement" for insulin resistance, measuring your insulin level — particularly after a meal (post-prandial) — will give you the information you really need without having to evaluate those other five measurements.

Dr. Joseph Kraft, former chairman of the department of clinical pathology and nuclear medicine at St. Joseph's Hospital, wrote the book "Diabetes Epidemic and You: Should Everyone Be Tested?" Based on data from some 14,000 patients, he developed a test that is a powerful predictor of diabetes. He would have the patient drink 75 grams of glucose, and then measure their insulin response over time, at half-hour intervals for up to five hours.
Interestingly, he noticed five distinctive patterns suggesting that a vast majority of people were already diabetic, even though their fasting glucose was normal. In fact, 90 percent of hyperinsulinemic patients passed the fasting glucose test, and 50 percent passed the glucose tolerance test. Only 20 percent of patients had the type 1 pattern signaling healthy post-prandial insulin sensitivity and low diabetes risk.
Cummins believes that using Kraft's test, about 65 percent of Americans or more probably would have hyperinsulinemia or "diabetes in situ." And, according to Kraft, "Those with cardiovascular disease not identified with diabetes … are simply undiagnosed."
One of the take-home messages here is that insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia are two sides of the same coin, as they drive and promote each other. In other words, if you have hyperinsulinemia, you are essentially insulin resistant and on your way toward developing full-blown diabetes lest you change your dietary course.

How Hyperinsulinemia/Insulin Resistance Causes Heart Disease

In summary, insulin resistance and/or hyperinsulinemia promote fatty liver — a combination that in turn drives high blood insulin and associated mechanistic pathways that shuttle lipids (fats) into your vascular walls, which is a hallmark of atherosclerosis. It also leads to high blood glucose, particularly post-prandial blood glucose, and this too has mechanistic pathways that promote atherosclerosis.
High blood pressure is another side effect of insulin resistance that drives atherosclerosis by placing stress on your arteries. As noted by Cummins, most idiopathic hypertension (high blood pressure with no known cause) is now thought to be caused by hyperinsulinemia.
Hyperinsulinemia/insulin resistance promotes inflammation, causing your visceral fat to release inflammatory cytokines and systemic signaling molecules. Over time, your visceral fat becomes increasingly resistant as well, causing the systemic signaling to falter. Taken as a whole, this cascade of events drives atherogenic dyslipidemia, characterized by the now familiar culprits: high LDL, oxidized LDL and triglycerides, and low HDL.
According to Cummins, while high LDL is a very erratic marker for heart disease risk, an elevated LDL "particle count" is actually a very good marker for insulin resistance. Thus the LDL metrics should be more thought of asindicative of inflammatory issues, and not as the LDL itself being the problem!
In its entirety, all of these factors are what flag the development of heart disease. Other factors that can influence your CVD risk include smoking and other environmental pollutants, especially heavy metals, so addressing and eliminating these kinds of toxic exposures would also be prudent.

How to Avoid Heart Disease

Evidence suggests high total cholesterol and even high LDL are insignificant when trying to determine your heart disease risk. Your best predictor is your insulin sensitivity. Considering how insulin resistance drives chronic disease in general, not just heart disease, I strongly recommend measuring your fasting insulin on a regular basis, and taking immediate action if you find yourself inching toward insulin resistance.
Your fasting insulin level can be determined by a simple, inexpensive blood test. A normal fasting blood insulin level is below 5, but ideally you'll want it below 3.  As for preventing or reversing hyperinsulinemia or insulin resistance, the following general guidelines will set you on the right track:
  1. Dramatically reduce your net carbs and eliminate processed fructose, as this is what set this cascade of metabolic dysfunction into motion in the first place. Replace the lost calories with higher amounts of healthy fats, not protein. My optimized nutritional plan can guide you through this process.
  2. Normalize your omega-3-to-omega-6 ratio. Most get far too little omega-3, found in fatty fish such as wild Alaskan salmon, sardines, anchovies, fish oil and krill oil, and too much omega-6, as it is plentiful in processed vegetable oils and hence processed and fried foods.
  3. Optimize your vitamin D level by getting regular, sensible sun exposure. Other nutrients of importance include magnesium and vitamins K2 and C.
  4. Get eight hours of high quality sleep each night to normalize your hormonal system. Research has shown sleep deprivation can have a significant bearing on your insulin sensitivity.
  5. Get regular exercise, as it is a powerful way to help normalize your insulin sensitivity.

12 Health Benefits Of Okra That Will Make You Love Greens

A good filler food, okra not only curbs hunger but keeps you from tiring, too. It also strengthens your immunity against conditions like diabetes, high cholesterol, Alzheimer’s, liver disease, breast cancer, and asthma. Being rich in vitamins A, C, and K, it helps fortify bones while also improving your eyesight. Experiment with okra water, peels, and powdered seeds to see what suits you best.

Health Benefits Of Okra

Ethiopian in origin, Abelmoschus esculentus or Hibiscus esculentus is known by many names around the world – okra, okro, lady’s finger (England), gumbo (U.S.), guino-gombo (Spain), guibeiro (Portugal), Kacang bendi (Malaysia), and bhindi, gombo, and bendakai (India). The fact that it even has that many names suggests its global popularity and widespread cultivation. The tender, young, seed-containing pod of the okra plant is eaten as a vegetable in salads, broths, stews, and stir-fries.
Being a green veggie, it is easy to wrap your head around the fact that okra is “all healthy.” Here’s what it offers:1 2
Interesting Facts About Okra
  • Cleopatra of Egypt and Yang Guifei of China loved to eat okra.
  • Okra seeds were used as coffee bean substitutes during World War II.
  • Okra found its way to different parts of the world during the Atlantic slave trade.
Nutrients In 1 Cup Of Okra% of Daily Value
Energy33 Calories –
Fiber3.2 gm12.8
Protein1.9 gm –
Carbohydrate7.5 gm –
Fat0.2 gm
Magnesium57 mg14.3
Calcium82 mg8.2
Potassium299 mg8.5
Sodium7 mg –
Vitamin C23 mg38.3
Vitamin K31.3 mg39.1
Folate (vitamin B9)60 µg15
Vitamin A716 IU14.3
Thiamin (vitamin B1)0.2 mg13.3
Vitamin B60.2 mg10.8

Benefits Of Okra

Like a number of natural ingredients, scientists are turning a keen eye to this time-tested home remedy. We now have research to back the folklore – which happened to be right. The following are benefits of okra, most of which would probably have never occurred to us.

1. Packs A Truckload Of Nutrients

Okra pods are loaded with significant amounts of vital nutrients – protein, fiber, calcium, iron, and zinc.3 It, thus, qualifies as an effective economical tool capable of treating malnutrition around the world.

2. Helps Control Hunger

Okra is loaded with soluble fibers.4 Soluble fiber makes you feel full faster and for longer. This can help keep your calorie intake in check, helping you with your weight loss goals. With a longer-lasting feeling of satiety, your need to binge will be curbed immensely.

3. Keeps You From Getting Tired

It is unfortunate how common the word “fatigue” has become in today’s world. What used to be mostly age and sickness-related, is now an everyday struggle for young, healthy individuals. Okra seeds can delay fatiguing.5 They contain antioxidant polyphenols and flavonoids that promote glycogen storage in the liver. Glycogen is a body fuel reserve, and more of it means you will take longer to tire.
This is why okra is also good for individuals suffering from depression. You will be able to fight the feeling of being inexplicably tired.6

4. Manages Diabetes Mellitus

Turkish people have long been consuming an infusion of roasted okra seeds to manage diabetes mellitus.
Okra’s peel and seed can lower blood glucose levels, making them useful in managing diabetes mellitus.7 They do so by inhibiting carb-breaking enzymes, increasing sensitivity to insulin, and ensuring there are sufficient insulin-producing cells in the pancreas.8 More insulin and less breakdown of carbs to glucose means lower blood sugar.
One study proved that okra seeds prevent the intestinal breakdown of carbohydrates to glucose by inhibiting the enzyme alpha-glucosidase.9

5. Stabilizes Cholesterol Levels

Okra would make a great functional food ingredient!
The more finely ground okra powder is, the better it can adsorb cholesterol.10
Okra promotes cholesterol degradation and inhibits the production of fat in the body.11 It, thus, decreases total cholesterol and triglyceride and enhances excretion of bile acids (made from cholesterol) in the feces.
By regulating cholesterol levels in the blood, okra can prevent clogging of arteries – protecting us from heart diseases like atherosclerosis.

6. Fortifies Bones And Prevents Excessive Bleeding

The most abundant vitamin in okra is vitamin K.12 This vitamin helps strengthen bones and promotes clotting of blood. Okra, thus, helps prevent osteoporosis, fractures, and excessive bleeding (due to injury or bleeding disorders).

7. Boosts Immunity And Improves Eyesight

Okra contains moderate levels of vitamin A.13 Vitamin A encourages the production of white blood cells, key players in your immune system. While infections and diseases do their rounds in the general population, okra will equip your body well enough to resist.
Vitamin A also supports eyes health. If you have weak eyesight or if you come from a family with a history of weak eyesight, it makes sense for you to consume okra regularly.

8. Prevents Gastritis

In Asian medicine, the fruit of the okra plant is used as a mucilaginous food additive to treat gastric irritations.
H. pylori bacteria infect the stomach lining and cause inflammation called gastritis. Okra juice contains anti-adhesive compounds that bind to the surface of free-floating bacteria in the gut.14 15 This unanticipated binding blocks sites on the bacteria responsible for docking to the stomach lining. In effect, okra juice prevents H. Pylori infections and gastritis.
A concern that arises is whether okra’s non-specific binding to bacteria can deter normal gut bacteria. Further studies are required to assess whether okra’s benefits outweigh its potential side effects. Having said that, we can take refuge in the fact that okra is eaten widely in Asia and Africa for centuries now with no adverse effects on the digestive system.
Children between 2 to 5 are more vulnerable to H. Pylori infections, so it makes sense to ensure they eat okra regularly.

9. Prevents Liver Disease

Your liver is your body’s prime detox organ. Okra can help ensure it is protected from disease. In one study, chemically-induced liver disease in rats was efficiently counteracted by okra.16 Oral pre-administration of okra extracts reduced the effects of damaging free radicals that cause liver disease. Okra may have done so by stabilizing liver cell membranes, making them more defensive against intruding free radicals.

10. Staves Off Neurodegenerative Disorders

Okra may help reduce the risks of Alzheimer’s in individuals who are genetically predisposed to it.17 It may also help prevent other neurodegenerative diseases related to oxidative stress.
Imagining how difficult it can be to live with a nerve disorder, this benefit of okra is of great preventive value.

11. Kills Breast Cancer Cells

In one study, a lectin isolated from okra was capable of instigating cell suicide in breast cancer cells.18 The growth of breast tumor cells was inhibited by a significant 63%.
Breast cancer affects 1 in 8 women during their lifetime.19 Incorporating okra in your diet may help reduce this statistic drastically.

12. Keeps Asthma Symptoms In Check

Okra seems to be beneficial for asthma patients.20 21 How exactly it does so is not yet known. Some postulate that okra’s high vitamin C content is responsible for its respiratory benefits, however, no clear correlation between vitamin C and asthma exists.22

How To Consume Okra

Cooking Tip: To make okra more palatable, cook it in slightly salted water to reduce its slimy texture.
It is safe to say that for the general population, okra is an acquired taste. You may incorporate it in your meals with some palate-appealing, healthy recipes. To maximize benefits, you may consume the following:

1. Okra Water

Soak okra pods in a glassful of water overnight at room temperature. Some of its water-soluble nutrients and compounds will get leached out into the water. Strain out the pod, and drink the infused water.
Alternatively, you may soak sliced pods instead of whole pods. Bear in mind that there will be a bitter after-taste.

2. Okra Peel

Using a handheld grater or lemon zester, scrape the peel from the okra pod. Directly consume about half a teaspoon of the peel at a time. This is a good way to avoid ingesting okra’s mucilaginous secretion.

3. Okra Powdered Seeds

It is difficult to manually separate okra seeds from the pod and then make a powder. A more pragmatic approach is to buy readily available dried okra seed powder. It is generally advised not to have more than 5 gm of this powder in a day. Check the dosage with your health practitioner, especially if you are on diabetic medications.
An Interesting Fact
In addition to the vast array of nutrients, okra also contains antinutrients that reduce the body’s ability to absorb essential nutrients. However, the antinutrients are low in concentration and the minerals okra offers can easily be absorbed and used by the body (mineral bioavailability is high) despite them.
One can argue that most of the laboratory studies supporting the claims mentioned above use extracts and isolated compounds from okra and not the whole pod. While that is mostly true, natural remedies are best self-tested. They have been proved worthy and effective for centuries now as opposed to antibiotics and drugs developed only in the last century or two. Don’t miss out!
View Article References (+)
Disclaimer: The content is purely informative and educational in nature and should not be construed as medical advice. Please use the content only in consultation with an appropriate certified medical or healthcare professional.